Create Plots Using Mathematica

Simple Plots

With Mathematica, you can effortlessly create simple plots.

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Dozens of options are available to customize plots. In this example, the Frame option is used to draw a box around the plot.

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Parametric Plots

Besides plotting standard linear and nonlinear equations in x and y, Mathematica can easily plot parametric curves.

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Combining Plots

Mathematica makes it easy to create plots with multiple functions. Just as easily as it can plot one equation, Mathematica can plot several equations simultaneously.

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Plotting Sets of Data

The ListPlot command allows you to easily plot sets of data, gathered or generated from a wide variety of sources. Here is a table of sin(x) values with "noise" added.

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Here is a plot of the data.

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Three-Dimensional Plots

Graphing functions of two variables in three dimensions can be done easily using Plot3D.

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As with all of Mathematica's plotting functions, you can add options to control how your plots look. In this example, options are used to show the function with a finer grid and with the axes suppressed.

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